Welcome to AZ-PRIDE

The Programs to Increase Diversity among Individuals Engaged in Health-Related Research, collectively referred to as PRIDE, were established to provide junior scientists, whose backgrounds are currently under-represented in biomedical research, with opportunities to gain the knowledge and tools they need to carry out independent and meaningful research and advance their careers. This initiative is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).

PRIDE is a consortium of NHLBI-funded Summer Institute Training Programs for Junior Faculty.
  • Each Summer Institute Training Program has the common goal of increasing the diversity among individuals who are engaged in health-related research
  • Each Summer Institute Program has a unique, specialized research focus, as described below under Summer Institute Training Programs.
  • Eligible individuals are encouraged to apply to the Summer Institute Program in your area of interest

Who is Eligible?

To be eligible to participate in a PRIDE Summer Institute Training Program, you must (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HL-14-021.html):
  • Be a research-oriented junior-level faculty member or transitioning* post-doctorate trainee
  • Be from a background that is underrepresented in the biomedical or health sciences
  • Be a Citizen or Permanent Resident of the United States
  • Have a research focus that is centered on heart, lung, blood, or sleep disorders research; health disparities research relevant to heart, lung, blood, or sleep disorders; or relevant research methodologies and approaches specific to these areas
* Transitioning means that you have or will have received a formal faculty appointment by the time the Summer Institute Program convenes.
 

General Program Structure

  • All-expenses-paid Summer Institute Training Programs for up to 3 weeks during each of two consecutive summers
  • Year-long mentoring experience with recognized experts in the field
  • Didactic instruction and hands-on practical training
  • Specific training and coaching in grant-writing skills
  • Mid-year meeting
  • Annual Conference in Bethesda, Maryland

News

UA Health Sciences’ ‘Project Taking Charge’ Benefits Students and Patients

Deploying an interdisciplinary, team-based outreach model for delivery of care, the University of Arizona Health Sciences’ “Project Taking Charge” works to improve health in Tucson’s most underserved communities through patient self-management.


Working to Ensure Diversity in Health Care, UA Health Sciences’ Summer Programs Begin June 4

The mentorship-based, highly competitive programs work to recruit and ultimately graduate a more diverse student body dedicated to serving Arizona and the nation’s most at-risk and underserved populations.


UA’s Agnes Attakai Receives National Rural Health Award

The National Rural Health Association has presented Agnes Attakai, MPA, director of health disparities outreach and prevention education at the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, the Rosemary McKenzie Legacy Award for her work as a champion of health equity in Arizona and nationally to reduce health disparities among Arizona’s Native Americans.